Watch: Colin Stetson – ‘Who The Waves Are Roaring For’.

(Photo via colinstetson.com)

The contribution made by the session musicians who record on artist’s music is often overlooked, as often there is a general belief that these musicians are instructed how to perform their part by the band, and are paid simply to do so. However, this is definitely not the case for Colin Stetson, who has contributed to a wealth of fantastically successful and excellent musical ventures, including Bon Iver (of which he is now a nominal member of), Arcade Fire, Tom Waits and TV on the Radio.

However, Stetson is not simply a session musician for other artists, but he has also released eight solo albums, the latest of which, New History Warfare Vol. 3: To See More Light was released in April of this year via Constellation Records. Stetson manages to inject music which may otherwise be viewed as devoid of any emotional undertones with a visceral fervour, which is often due to his fantastically unorthodox approach to playing the bass saxophone. In listening to New History Warfare Vol. 3 it is plainly obvious how monumental Stetson’s contribution to his other works is, especially in the production of Bon Iver’s 2011 stunningly emotional sophomore album Bon Iver, Bon Iver.

Last week, Stetson posted a video to accompany ‘Who The Waves Are Roaring For’, which is taken from New History Warfare Vol. 3: To See More Light and features the soaring falsetto vocals of Stetson’s Bon Iver bandmate Justin Vernon. The video was directed by Isaac Gale, who has also created videos for Bon Iver (he contributed to the direction of the video version of Bon Iver, Bon Iver), Poliça and GAYNGS amongst others.

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Listen: Babyshambles’ leading single from upcoming album ‘Sequel to the Prequel’ – ‘Nothing Comes to Nothing’.

(Photo via concreteplayground.com.au)

Yesterday (8th July), Zane Lowe premiered the leading single from Babyshambles‘ forthcoming LP Sequel to the Prequel, which is entitled ‘Nothing Comes To Nothing’. Sequel to the Prequel will be released via Parlophone Records on the 2nd September.

Watch: The National discuss Nicki Minaj, parenthood and the validity of religion (via Pitchfork.tv).

(Photo via last.fm)

On the latest installment of Pitchfork’s ‘Over/Under’ series of videos, The National discuss the joys of changing babies’ nappies, the validity of both the Church of Scientology and organised religion as a whole and how The Police are overrated. Watch the video via Ptchfork.tv below.

Watch: James Blake perform at the Cité de la musique Live in Paris.

(Photo via AllIDoIsListen.com)

Last Thursday (July 4th), post-dubstep producer James Blake performed at the Cité de la Musique Live in Paris in support of his stunning follow up to his 2011 self-titled debut album Overgrown. Blake performed a sixteen-song set composed mostly of material from Overgrown and his self-titled debut album, although he did also perform material from 2010s Klavierwerke EP and CMYK EP, and 2011’s Enough Thunder EP. He closed the set with a stunning cover of Joni Mitchell‘s ‘A Case of You’, from Enough Thunder.

Stream the performance over at Cité de la Musique Live here.

Cité de la Musique (City of the Music Live) is a group of institutions situated in La Villette quarter of Paris, France which is dedicated to the promotion of arts.

You can read my review of James Blake’s sublime second album Overgrown at The Mancunion here.

Listen: Tired Pony premiere the leading single from forthcoming LP ‘Ghost of the Mountain’ – ‘All Things At Once’.

(Photo via maxabroadphotography.wordpress.com)

This morning, indie-folk ‘supergroup’ Tired Pony premiered a track called ‘All Things At Once’ the first single from their forthcoming album on Shaun Keaveny’s show on BBC 6music this morning (8th July). They also announced that their awaited sophomore album Ghost of the Mountain would be released on 19th August via Fiction Records, and the single ‘All Things At Once’ will be released on 26th August.

Talking about the album, Peter Buck (previously of R.E.M.) said “We were trying to soak up the Topanga canyon folk vibe but also bring the discordant Krautrock and weird synth-pop sound into it too.”